Attraction to Body Odor resulting from Perspiration

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August Campbell

My ultimate dream came true.
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Has this happened to anyone else here in their relationships? It has to do with the lady's body odor. It's when Sheila and I used to go Hiking, during which Sheila used to perspire profusely, much more than me. At that point, her body odor was quite strong. Compared to playing Tennis during which we were at quite a distance so the scent would not reach. But in the Hiking, we were of course walking side by side, so the scent would be strongly picked up. The odor from her sweat was unique, totally different from the scent of other ladies. Impossible to describe the odor because of nothing to compare it with. All I can say is that it differs from the "normal" odor from perspiration.
The point is that I found it so appealing.
Would that be considered a Fetish? Because I've heard of people who find somebody attractive just because of their Voice. Not their appearance but their voice. But in this case, it's the odor resulting from sweat. Has anyone else experienced this in their relationships?
 
Hey August,

Well, I can't say that I've ever found body odor appealing. I guess it could be considered a fetish maybe.
 
I don't think it's a fetish, I think we are naturally disposed to using our sense of smell to help decide who we are attracted to. I myself can only say that if a partner hasn't showered, I am more likely to be put off rather than turned on.

People release pheromones, a unique scent that may be sexually stimulating to some. This is why some get high by sniffing soiled panties, used bras, sweaty armpits and other material items I leave to your wild imagination. Not my cup of tea but if it's consensual and rocks your boat embrace it son, life's too short.
 
I don't think it's a fetish, I think we are naturally disposed to using our sense of smell to help decide who we are attracted to. I myself can only say that if a partner hasn't showered, I am more likely to be put off rather than turned on.

People release pheromones, a unique scent that may be sexually stimulating to some. This is why some get high by sniffing soiled panties, used bras, sweaty armpits and other material items I leave to your wild imagination. Not my cup of tea but if it's consensual and rocks your boat embrace it son, life's too short.
Thanks for your answer. Much as I appreciate your response, I had ended the relationship with the lady because of too much drama. In my life, I had two relationships, and they are enough for me. And those two relationships began inadvertently, that is, I was not looking for any relationship at all--but they just happened to me, so I just went with the flow.
Buddhism has taught me to not have emotional attachments, so the break-off was not painful, no heartbreak at all. And they ended amicably.
After all that experience I can honestly say that I prefer socializing with just Males only. Because there's no drama.
Actually for Male buddies, I have only one that I see on a regular basis. And it's a gent I've known ever since the early 1970s. Maybe it's because he lives just three blocks from my home so it's within walking distance.
 
I can understand that for inanimate objects, but for living creatures? I didn’t know that about Buddhism. I think such an attachment is not only good, but essential. Control of excessive emotion though is a worthy practice.
Buddhism is often seen as the acceptable face of religion, lacking a celestial dictator and full of Eastern wisdom. But if one starts looking a bit closer, at the ramifications of Buddhist belief in practice, there is a lurking darkness there, quietly stated and eloquently crafted, but every bit as profound as the Hellfire's of Christianity or the rhetoric of jihad.
 
Buddhism is often seen as the acceptable face of religion, lacking a celestial dictator and full of Eastern wisdom. But if one starts looking a bit closer, at the ramifications of Buddhist belief in practice, there is a lurking darkness there, quietly stated and eloquently crafted, but every bit as profound as the Hellfire's of Christianity or the rhetoric of jihad.
When compared with other religions, Buddhism is often seen as the Practical religion because it's Not supernatural. Instead the focus is on mastering our emotions.

On the other hand, Christianity insists that Homosexuals go to Hell to be tortured forever. Is that what you meant by "dark"?
 
it's Not supernatural. Instead the focus is on mastering our emotions.
The original teachings of the Buddha included supernatural elements; most noticeably reincarnation, karma and the cycle of birth and death. Buddhists believe that the human life is one of suffering, and that meditation, spiritual and physical labour, and good behaviour are the ways to achieve enlightenment, or nirvana. In his first sermon, the Buddha said, “I teach one thing and one thing only: suffering and the end of suffering,” which is the ultimate goal of Buddhism. Beliefs found in Buddhism that could be called supernatural are rebirth, the working of karma over multiple lifetimes, heavens and hells, devas and Māras, miracles, merit and merit transfer, and many of the psychic powers mentioned in Buddhist texts (e.g., walking through walls, flying, and talking with gods.).

On the other hand, Christianity insists that Homosexuals go to Hell to be tortured forever. Is that what you meant by "dark"?
There's a persistent and widespread belief that Buddhist societies really are peaceful and harmonious. This presumption is evident in the reactions of astonishment many people have to events like those that took place in Myanmar. How could a Buddhist society, especially Buddhist monks!, have anything to do with something so monstrously violent as the ethnic cleansing being perpetrated on Myanmar’s Rohingya minority? Aren’t Buddhists supposed to be compassionate and pacifist?.

There is no shortage of historical examples of violence in Buddhist societies. Sri Lanka’s long and tragic civil war for example, involved a great deal of specifically Buddhist nationalism on the part of a Sinhalese majority resentful of the presence of Tamil Hindus in what the former took to be the last bastion of true Buddhism (the “island of dharma”). Political violence in modern Thailand, too, has often been inflected by Buddhist involvement, and there is a growing body of scholarly literature on the martial complicity of Buddhist institutions in World War II era Japanese nationalism. Even the history of the Dalai Lama’s own sect of Tibetan Buddhism includes events like the razing of rival monasteries, and recent decades have seen a controversy centred on a wrathful protector deity believed by some of the Dalai Lama’s fellow religionists to heap destruction on the false teachers of rival sects.

I recently visited China and spoke with Han Buddhists who's views on people that belong to one of the dozens of officially recognized minority ethnic groups, are horrific.

Should we talk about the prevalent attitude of ascetic misogyny which sees the female as signifying desire per se and posing a continuous threat to male monastics wishing to preserve their celibacy. It typically expresses itself in vilifying women for their presumed ability to prey on innocent males to satisfy their sexual desires.

I was raised a Catholic, I ran away from home as a teen and lived in an ashram with Sikhs and Jains, I spent time in India training to teach yoga and hung with Buddhists and Hindus, I've sung and danced with Jesuits and Sufi's along the Mediterranean coast and I've loved a few pagan witches and an Eastern Orthodox gypsy. I realised, very quickly, all religion is about manipulation and control.

If you really want to know the effect organised religion of any kind has had on the world grab a passport and a pair of hiking boots and go take a look, it's a bloody revelation sunshine.
 
The original teachings of the Buddha included supernatural elements; most noticeably reincarnation, karma and the cycle of birth and death. Buddhists believe that the human life is one of suffering, and that meditation, spiritual and physical labour, and good behaviour are the ways to achieve enlightenment, or nirvana. In his first sermon, the Buddha said, “I teach one thing and one thing only: suffering and the end of suffering,” which is the ultimate goal of Buddhism. Beliefs found in Buddhism that could be called supernatural are rebirth, the working of karma over multiple lifetimes, heavens and hells, devas and Māras, miracles, merit and merit transfer, and many of the psychic powers mentioned in Buddhist texts (e.g., walking through walls, flying, and talking with gods.).


There's a persistent and widespread belief that Buddhist societies really are peaceful and harmonious. This presumption is evident in the reactions of astonishment many people have to events like those that took place in Myanmar. How could a Buddhist society, especially Buddhist monks!, have anything to do with something so monstrously violent as the ethnic cleansing being perpetrated on Myanmar’s Rohingya minority? Aren’t Buddhists supposed to be compassionate and pacifist?.

There is no shortage of historical examples of violence in Buddhist societies. Sri Lanka’s long and tragic civil war for example, involved a great deal of specifically Buddhist nationalism on the part of a Sinhalese majority resentful of the presence of Tamil Hindus in what the former took to be the last bastion of true Buddhism (the “island of dharma”). Political violence in modern Thailand, too, has often been inflected by Buddhist involvement, and there is a growing body of scholarly literature on the martial complicity of Buddhist institutions in World War II era Japanese nationalism. Even the history of the Dalai Lama’s own sect of Tibetan Buddhism includes events like the razing of rival monasteries, and recent decades have seen a controversy centred on a wrathful protector deity believed by some of the Dalai Lama’s fellow religionists to heap destruction on the false teachers of rival sects.

I recently visited China and spoke with Han Buddhists who's views on people that belong to one of the dozens of officially recognized minority ethnic groups, are horrific.

Should we talk about the prevalent attitude of ascetic misogyny which sees the female as signifying desire per se and posing a continuous threat to male monastics wishing to preserve their celibacy. It typically expresses itself in vilifying women for their presumed ability to prey on innocent males to satisfy their sexual desires.

I was raised a Catholic, I ran away from home as a teen and lived in an ashram with Sikhs and Jains, I spent time in India training to teach yoga and hung with Buddhists and Hindus, I've sung and danced with Jesuits and Sufi's along the Mediterranean coast and I've loved a few pagan witches and an Eastern Orthodox gypsy. I realised, very quickly, all religion is about manipulation and control.

If you really want to know the effect organised religion of any kind has had on the world grab a passport and a pair of hiking boots and go take a look, it's a bloody revelation sunshine.
Don't forget the bloody war in Northern Ireland between the Protestants and Catholics, fraught with car bombings, riots, and revenge killings.
Widespread bloodshed that left some 3,600 people dead.
Also the many Catholic priests who have been convicted of child abuse, pedophilia. There was even one priest who had at least 100 victims. That was Catholic priest James Porter.
And of course there are the Islamic terrorists. But those are the radicals, because the Muslims I've met personally are peace-loving.
And just as there are many Catholics who are compassionate and charitable, so also for Buddhists. Remember, the Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

As far as Buddhism and its absence of supernaturalism, the Buddhist priest I had while growing up was Atheist. That's what I meant by the absence of the supernatural. It depends on the denomination as the one I was taught did not mention the supernatural at all but instead focused on just mastering our emotions. I've even met Buddhists who get annoyed when the supernatural is mentioned.

When all is said and done, I agree with you that religion is good and bad. And certainly agree that it is found in All religions.

By the way, you said you visited China again. Sounds like you visit the Orient on a periodical basis. What interests you so much that you keep visiting?
 
I can understand that for inanimate objects, but for living creatures? I didn’t know that about Buddhism. I think such an attachment is not only good, but essential. Control of excessive emotion though is a worthy practice.
That excessive emotion, as you called it, is what happens from emotional attachment especially between a man and a woman. Because if they break up, then one of them can become even suicidal. I've seen it happen with one of my neighbors, so I know.
Romance is exciting and exhilarating, but many pay a terrible price in the end.
 
That excessive emotion, as you called it, is what happens from emotional attachment especially between a man and a woman. Because if they break up, then one of them can become even suicidal. I've seen it happen with one of my neighbors, so I know.
Romance is exciting and exhilarating, but many pay a terrible price in the end.
But that's what I'm talking about, controlling excessive emotion. It doesn't mean you shouldn't have ANY emotional attachment. I've very well aware of how people can lose control of their emotions. I was a cop for over 20 years. I know all about it and seem a great deal of things you would never want to. Some people may pay a high price, but they're people with poor behavioural skills. You should learn how to control any excursiveness, but I wouldn't advocate for eliminating ALL emotional attachment. We are living creatures, not inanimate objects.
 

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